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Case Studies

Christopher

Christopher has had trouble reading for years. He never really got reading and has struggled for years. Within a couple of weeks of using EasyRead his reading improved dramatically. He has several months into it and the difference is amazing! His confidence level has skyrocketed in all walks of life. This has been an excellent investment and would do it again.

Tavia van Deventer

As a Mom ready to pull my hair out with a little girl aged 8 so eager to learn to read but so frustrated that reading became a complete nightmare and a constant fight every day trying to do homework.  I went in search of a solution or tool to help me understand why this was happening and came across Easyread. I watch the intro video and was convinced David was referring to Donae as he spoke.  Well within a few days Donae wanted to read and would actually get her homework done just to be able to do easyread or "David" as she called it. We have not looked back and still enjoy our daily Easyread session. We have a reading agent it training and her reading and self confidence has improved dramatically.  She now reads with confidence and enjoys it! Her younger brother Ethan has also just started his reading agent training and also loves the reading and games.  I too have been most impressed by the constant hands on support of the Easyread team.  Being in South Africa I assumed it would be difficult to communicate but have not once had a problem.  Thanks to the whole Easyread team for changing my and my childrens lives.

Alexander Moufarrej

Alexander was diagnoised with hearing difficulties at the age of 6, he had glue ear and missed most of his early phonics, making sounding out and reading difficult. This effected his reading and confidence. We embarked on the Easy Read program and Alexander has been focussed and happy to follow the program. He had found it fun and engaging and will add a comment himself." I LOVE EASY READ BECAUSE IT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT HELPED ME READ AT THE BEGINING, THANK YOU AGENT D "

T Jones

Easyread proved invaluable for my son. As a young child he was always full of confidence and fun,  but then started falling behind at school due to his undiagnosed dyslexia. He lost confidence in all aspects of his life- refusing to go to football and rugby etc. When browsing the Internet I came across easy read and enrolled. He came on in leaps and bounds and as a result his confidence was restored.  By now he is a happy confident 14 year old who is in both the area rugby team and as well as being top scorer (by far) for his own football team, he has got into the area football academy.  So Easyread has not only helped his reading, but his general confidence. Thank you

Brandon Howell

I want to say thanks to Easy Read.  I started this program at the beginning of 2011, after being diagnosed with a rare learning disability.  I suffered for many years, as I was enrolled in a French Immersion Program and teachers assumed I was struggiling with language but that soon everything would be fine.  Finally in Grade 7, they had me tested and found that I had an auditory  learning disability.  My mom found Easy Read on the Internet.  It was a slow start, but after learning and understanding the decoding process I was able to read the stories.  From here I was able to start reading books easier and both my mom and me have been recommending the program to others.  When I started high school, I changed into an English Program and found high school courses and homework load overwhelming and took a break from Easy Read.  Now that I am in Grade 9 and still reading below grade level by a couple of years, I am returning to my daily Easy Read lessons and looking forward to finishing the program.  My mom and I looked over the website to both Easy Read and Helping Every Child to Read, I look forward to looking into some of the other programs, especially ones on auditory processing weakness to see what may help me more. I work better with my hands and visual aid items and have recentlly registered as an electrician apprentice as well as doing a work practicum.  I wanted to share my story so others can see that a reading disability is nothing to be ashamed of (at any age).  You may be slower than some of your friends with reading or spelling, however in the long run - you can do anything you want - it just takes time and sometimes a little longer. I wish the best to those in the program and any new comers researching this program.  

Alex & Annabelle

2009: When Alex started school last year he was very anxious about his phonics, and very reluctant to try to read, anything longer than three letters and he panicked, he hated getting things wrong so he wouldn't try to read anything he couldn't recognise, so phonics was a nightmare as it relies on decoding the sounds. His twin sister was doing really well which made him feel worse. We felt he lacked confidence and we felt that we needed to help him feel comfortable enough to participate in class, and enjoy learning to read rather than start in an anxious state. What we read on the Easyread site led us to try the first five lessons, and we had no hesitation in subscribing at that point for Alex.    Alex was quickly won over by the characters, they tickled his sense of humour, and the exercises made him feel good about his ability to recognise the characters. He loved the games, and the prizes were a really nice touch. The characters took the pressure off remembering the letters, and they helped him understand that some letters have more than one sound, and that words can be broken down into chunks. David's voice over made him feel grown up because it was directed to him, and best of all each lesson was so short that he always wanted more.    His greatest reward now is when a joke accompanies a lesson. He moans about reading the books he brings back from school, he sees that as a chore, (they are pretty dull) , but he asks to do Easyread, finds the words entertaining, likes the pictures, and the stories, so I never have to nag him into it.    We hit one issue along the way, when we felt he was overly dependant on the characters, but we consulted David, he suggested we talk it over with Alex, and that child centred approach worked really well,  we read the page as normal first, then with Alex's agreement we covered the characters up and rewarded his attempts with smarties, within a week he had achieved a balance, we stopped having to cover up the characters because he was processing both the letters and the characters together, and over the next month he started using a combination of methods - reading some words by sight, most from the letters, and he then refers to the characters as he needs to.    We had a parents evening last week, Alex had a reading level assessment, and is reading at year 2 level 6, he is five years old and has just entered year 1. He is now reading Fantastic Mr Fox in paperback, on his own. I can't tell you how thrilled we are that he is now a 'reader'. He doesn't have any sense that reading is hard, he isn't phased by words he doesn't recognise, or long words, he tries them out if he isn't sure, and because David has taught him not to guess he stops to check the meaning of words he doesn't understand or can't decode. As far as he is concerned, best of all, is that he can independently play his Wii and Playstation because he can now read the messages. At the risk of gushing, it was one of the best decision we've made for Alex. All we need now is for someone to do the same for numeracy!   Annabelle's situation is different. We almost didn't enrol her into the Easyread program, we were focused on Alex's 'problem'. We didn't think she needed any reading support and its a fair amount of money, but we decided to treat them the same rather than have Alex think he was in some way less capable. She progressed faster than him initially, and she was confident with her Jolly phonics at school, but she doesn't enjoy the reading books from school either, so Easyread is ensuring that she gets a more enjoyable experience. She hasn't made the same leap that Alex has, but she is in the top reading set in her year group, and I think she just is more interested in writing than Alex, so her progress is slower because she wants to be able to internalise what she is reading - she comments on silent letters, long and short vowels when she reads and then incorporates these into her little notes and stories that she writes. Her easyread material exposes her to much more interesting words, rhymes, and is definitely ensuring that she feels positive about reading.   Feb 2013 I posted the above as I wanted to share both our thoughts and impressions from the period when the twins were following the Easyvread program, and add our reflection today, four years later.  Alex and Annabelle are now 9 years old. Last year, at the start of year 3 they were tested at school for their reading age, both were both confidently and fluently reading secondary school level material. They love literacy, both reading and writing, and it is because they have felt capable throughout the last few years, Easyread gave them a huge confidence boost, making them feel really good about their reading ability, they have entirely positive emotions about literacy work. Maths is a different ball game, and I can see just how much self belief and confidence, or lack of,  affects their enjoyment and progress.   Neither of my children had demonstrated any particular difficulties with reading beyond Alex's lack of confidence, but I had a gut feeling at the time that it was important to provide them with a positive start. looking back it was the most significant decision we made, one I would recommend to anyone that wants to instill a real love of books and reading in their child. I'm incredibly thankful we found Easyread.   Lisa  

Tom Whaley

Tom was always a friendly, outgoing boy and didn't appear to have any problems with phonics and reading at nursery and in the first years of primary school. When he got to Primary 4 it all appeared to go wrong. He started to struggle with the basics of spelling and his writing and reading deteriorated. He also became very withdrawn and appeared to have lost his confidence. This all came to at a very concerning parent/teacher evening at school where the teacher said that he was now in the bottom group for reading and that he had regressed to a Primary 3 level. His behaviour was also becoming an issue. So, something had to be done and the first port of call was the Head Teacher. She did offer to help but nothing could be done in the short-term as school resources were tight. The next stop was the Internet. After hours of searching for causes and cures, we came across Easyread and reading the descriptions of other people's issues with their children was just like reading about Tom. The decision was made, Tom needed Easyread. After a few weeks, he was signed up and ready to make a start with Spell Magic. I have to admit that I was concerned that it wouldn't capture Tom's imagination but how wrong could I be! He loved it and he was soon getting to grips with the various characters and their sounds. Level 1 was achieved without any problems and the arrival of his prize in the post spurred him on and on. He is now on lesson 105 and still enjoys every lesson and never complains about doing the work. The most satisfying thing is the improvement that we have seen, not only in his school work (reading, writing and spelling) but he has returned to his happy, friendly and outgoing self. His class teacher has also commented on the improvement in his general performance and behaviour at school. However, the most touching thing for us as parents is that Tom now loves to take his youngest brother up to bed so that he can read him a bedtime story. 12 months ago Tom wouldn't have wanted or been able to read to his brother in bed. If you are thinking about signing up for Easyread and Spell Magic I would urge you not to waste another minute, sign up today. You will be delighted with the progress and improvement in your child's development. David and his team at Easyread should be applauded for the work that they do. Keep up the good work. Guy Whaley  

Daniel and Emily Ramazani

My children Daniel 9 and Emily 7 love Easyread. They enjoy doing it everyday specially the games. They get very excited every time they get a prize and love to play spies. I like the program because it is easy and fun for the kids and with no hard work you can get amazing result. Thank you so much for the wonderful and clever program that makes reading enjoyable for my kids.

Sheelagh Bennett

My son we knew was capable of many things, by the age of six he could strip an engine perfectly at his fathers workshop but he couldn't read or write. His school kept saying he would get it because boys are slower to understand the workings of reading. We kept asking for help but none was given and he couldn't break down the words to read a story, so he gave up and said he was clever. At this point I contacted Esayread System and they immediatly understood and set a programme in place. Soon he could understand their phonics and breakdown words, he could read and was so releaved that he now could enjoy reading. He completed the course and doesn't think twice about picking up a book, his teachers are amazed with his reading standered and we couldn't be more proud of him. If you think your child has a problem please keep on pushing to get help it was a relief to us when we bgan the Easyread system.

Joshua Hoge

I know there are a ton of parents on a worldwide scale, as well as adults, who are suffering from Dyslexia, reading retention and more.  I am a Parent of two children who where diagnoised with PDD and Asperger's, ADHD, and more seven years ago.  Of course we saw issues earlier, but did not want to admit there may be a problem. After years of therapies: OT, PT, Speech, Counseling, the children "graduated" out of the westernized medicine therapies with the lablel, "There is nothing more we can do for your children, they have progressed as far as they may go."  We were told the children would not be able to read much at all, especially my son.  We searched the world over, looking for help, tutors, Office of Exceptional children, friends, familiy, churches, and more.  In the end, we where not having much success until we found Easy Read System, and David and his staff. I do not know how else to tell another parent but to say, these people care.  They really do.  Your child's success is important.  If you are willing to dedicate no more than 20 minutes a day with your child, they will learn to read with this system.  My son has Amblyopia, Strabismus, Food Allergies, Chemical Allergies, Medication Allergies and more.  We were told to institutionalize him and my daughter.  However, after hard work, on their part, and with great advice and leadership from the Easy Read System, they are not only reading, but thriving.  The course should not take as long for you as it did for us because we obviously have extreme issues.  However, Easy Read stuck with us and now no matter what, my children's world is forever at their fingertips because they can read, and are getting faster at it every day.  Do not be discouraged, this system works.  In the end, this was the least expensive therapy we ever tried with the highest reward.  If you cannot read, almost everything seems hard.  IF you need help with Dyslexia, this is the best program available in the world.  5 stars out of 5 stars! This system works.

Robert Warren

As a nine year old 3rd grader I made medical history.  I was sledding down a very large hill (on hospital grounds thank goodness) with my friend Mark.  We hit a huge jump, became airborn, and as I landed my forearms took the impact of myself, and Mark who landed on top of me.  I didn't know it at the time but I had broken both bones in both arms - identical breaks (the medical history part).  Because I couldn't go to school for several weeks the school district issued me a tutor.  The "silver lining" to this story is that the tutor identified an as of yet undiagnosed reading problem - Dyslexia.  About 40 years later 1 of my 3 children (all boys) has severe dyslexia. We have been trying various interventions and Easyread seems to be the best so far.  My son is making great gains.  As for me, I ended up as an elementary special ed. teacher!  Funny how life comes full circle.

Annika Speckhart

Both my girls have gone to Waldorf inspired charter schools, which meant that reading is a bit delayed in the approach to learning. This suited both my girls, who have loved the active play approach that those type of schools take to early childhood learning. It is not really until second grade that real reading is introduced. Clara, my 12 year old, leraned her alphabet slowly in first grade, and didn't learn to read until second grade, but since that is the approach, it was never a problem, and is totally following the schedule that those type of schools follow. they do not belive that starting any earlier has any benefit, in fact that starting to early means the child learns in the right brain and it is only first after the age of 7 that the left brain starts to develop enough to start reading. Even though kids can learn to read by using the right brain, and do so all the time, it is not something they recommend. Clara is now a great top of the line student in six grade. After initial slow learning at first, she simply took off without any issues and is way ahead of her class on pretty much all testing and is getting A+ on pretty much everything she does in school, and that without much effort from us as parents. So, due to the experince with my first child, when my now 9 year old daugher, Ella, was not reading in second grade, we thought that it was just that she was slow, and that she needed a bit more time. However, after working with very simple books and first readers over and over, and never seeming to get further ahead, it got to be a problem for her. She lost self esteem, felt bad about being so behind all the other kids and started to feel like school was not a place for her. It caused bad behavior in school as well as major unsecure feelings in her.  At the beginning of third grade it seemed as if the problem had gotten even worse, and we were told she was about 2 and a half year behind her grade level in reading, by one person ourside of the school. Ella compared herself to a friends sister, who has downs syndrome and a hard time speaking, however reads better than Ella, and Ella concluded, in her own words, that she is "even dumber than the down syndrome child". She cried every day and begged to not have to go to school, which was so hard to watch as a parent. That was when we desperately searched for some help, and found the easyread system from Oxford learning. We tried it and what a relief to get information and help that we could do for just a short time every day and not feel completely stuck. And yes, to our great surprise, we wsaw that in just a very very short time, Ella improved dramatically. I would say we saw quite a lot of big improvements in the first month or so. It has now gotten clear that Ella has eye tracking issues, and that was something that was pointed out to us by easyread as well. Receiving that kind of information early on is so valuable, and seems like gold in helping Ella move ahead. She is continuing with easyread, as well as eyetracking exercises, every day, is finding easyread to be a great  way to read, rather than struggling with self confidence lowering books, and we are seeing great work in school. According to her teacher, she is on track with the rest of the class and is doing very good work in class. School and reading has still not gotten to be fun for her, but she goes without a problem and is feeling so much better about herself. This is an incredible relief!! We are all looking forward to more months with easyread, it is such an easy and fun way to learn, and know that it is the answer we were looking for. All the improvement we have had so far makes everything much easier both in school and at home. We are really grateful.

Annika Speckhart

Both my girls have gone to Waldorf inspired charter schools, which meant that reading is a bit delayed in the approach to learning. This suited both my girls, who have loved the active play approach that those type of schools take to early childhood learning. It is not really until second grade that real reading is introduced. Clara, my 12 year old, leraned her alphabet slowly in first grade, and didn't learn to read until second grade, but since that is the approach, it was never a problem, and is totally following the schedule that those type of schools follow. they do not belive that starting any earlier has any benefit, in fact that starting to early means the child learns in the right brain and it is only first after the age of 7 that the left brain starts to develop enough to start reading. Even though kids can learn to read by using the right brain, and do so all the time, it is not something they recommend. Clara is now a great top of the line student in six grade. After initial slow learning at first, she simply took off without any issues and is way ahead of her class on pretty much all testing and is getting A+ on pretty much everything she does in school, and that without much effort from us as parents. So, due to the experince with my first child, when my now 9 year old daugher, Ella, was not reading in second grade, we thought that it was just that she was slow, and that she needed a bit more time. However, after working with very simple books and first readers over and over, and never seeming to get further ahead, it got to be a problem for her. She lost self esteem, felt bad about being so behind all the other kids and started to feel like school was not a place for her. It caused bad behavior in school as well as major unsecure feelings in her.  At the beginning of third grade it seemed as if the problem had gotten even worse, and we were told she was about 2 and a half year behind her grade level in reading, by one person ourside of the school. Ella compared herself to a friends sister, who has downs syndrome and a hard time speaking, however reads better than Ella, and Ella concluded, in her own words, that she is "even dumber than the down syndrome child". She cried every day and begged to not have to go to school, which was so hard to watch as a parent. That was when we desperately searched for some help, and found the easyread system from Oxford learning. We tried it and what a relief to get information and help that we could do for just a short time every day and not feel completely stuck. And yes, to our great surprise, we wsaw that in just a very very short time, Ella improved dramatically. I would say we saw quite a lot of big improvements in the first month or so. It has now gotten clear that Ella has eye tracking issues, and that was something that was pointed out to us by easyread as well. Receiving that kind of information early on is so valuable, and seems like gold in helping Ella move ahead. She is continuing with easyread, as well as eyetracking exercises, every day, is finding easyread to be a great  way to read, rather than struggling with self confidence lowering books, and we are seeing great work in school. According to her teacher, she is on track with the rest of the class and is doing very good work in class. School and reading has still not gotten to be fun for her, but she goes without a problem and is feeling so much better about herself. This is an incredible relief!! We are all looking forward to more months with easyread, it is such an easy and fun way to learn, and know that it is the answer we were looking for. All the improvement we have had so far makes everything much easier both in school and at home. We are really grateful.
Ants in Pink Pants are the funniest way to learn to read, ever!

Ants in Pink Pants are the funniest way to learn to read, ever!

'Ants in Pink Pants are the funniest way to learn to read, ever!' This is what my son Jack said in response to the Easy Read Learning System. He was 7 years old when we began to use the system. I was tearing my hair out because reading book time was a nightmare. He used to cry and physically couldn't do it, and yet he was extremely talented at using a computer.

I did a search on-line as I hadn't received any help from the school. The teacher said she was the link teacher for dyslexia and Jack wasn't showing any of the signs. The on-line search proved useful, I thought, 'if I could just find something on-line that would combine his love of computers with learning how to read' And there it was....Easyread appeared. I showed it to Jack and he thought it looked interesting. Already he had forgotten his fears.

These fears were soon allayed when he took the trial lesson. Jack really loved it and was laughing his head off at the ants in pink pants, he was reading straight away! He didn't realise he was doing it, and couldn't wait until after school every evening to complete his module. In fact, I even found him logging in on a morning so that he could do 10 or 15 minutes before school. Instantly the tears stopped and Jack very quickly realised his own ability.

I spoke to his teacher a parents evening, she admitted she had been astounded at Jack's progress and asked me how I had managed to get him over his fears. I asked if I could have a go on her lap top and showed her the Easyread system on-line. She said she thought it was brilliant and that she would look into it's availability for the school for other children to use it.

Jack has never looked back since his Easyread experience. He only needed to use it for a couple of months and then his new found confidence enabled him to 'go it alone'. Jack didn't even notice he was reading by himself. The only things he missed about Easyread when he didn't need it any more, were the personal emails and prizes from David, which he absolutely adored, these emails and prizes really spurred him on to carry on with the programme. Jack couldn't wait for the post to see what he had won.

Jack is now 11 years old and doing really well at Selby High School, he plays Rugby and has regular guitar lessons. Jack is ahead in all his subjects. I really don't think he would be where he is today if it weren't for Easyread, he would have got behind and lost his confidence and this probably could have meant lots of costly private tuition, I doubt tuition would have produced the same result. At least Easyread allowed Jack to take control of his situation for himself. This is the most important thing. Thank you so much David and Easyread, you have changed our lives!

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