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Reading Help Article Library > Auditory Processing Disorder

Several Kansas State University faculty members are helping children with auditory processing disorder receive better treatment. Debra Burnett, assistant professor of family studies and human services and a licensed speech-language pathologist, started the Enhancing Auditory Responses to Speech Stimuli, or EARSS, program. The Kansas State University Speech and Hearing Center offers the program, which uses evidence-based practices to treat auditory processing disorder.
Read full article: Science Daily
Many of the reading problems students encounter are related to the five components of reading (phonological and phonemic awareness, word decoding and phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) covered in Target the Problem! For some students, however, the problem may be the result of a combination of factors
Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), also known as Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD), is a problem with the way individuals process sounds
In recent years, there has been a dramatic upsurge in professional and public awareness of Auditory Processing Disorders (APD), also referred to as Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD). Unfortunately, this increase in awareness has resulted in a plethora of misconceptions and misinformation, as well as confusion regarding just what is (and isn't) an APD, how APD is diagnosed, and methods of managing and treating the disorder.
Auditory processing disorder (APD), also known as central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), is a complex problem affecting about 5% of school-aged children. These kids can't process the information they hear in the same way as others because their ears and brain don't fully coordinate. Something adversely affects the way the brain recognizes and interprets sounds, most notably the sounds composing speech.
Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) is not an issue with hearing sounds, but an issue with how the brain interprets the sounds that are heard. The challenges most often arise with spoken speech since the differences between sounds can be subtle and therefore more difficult for an individual with APD to detect. The presence of background noise can make this even more difficult. But even without background noise, people with APD are often have difficulty distinguishing differences between similar parts of speech.  For example, you can say

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